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Know Your J-Jargon

CPA (Cost Per Action): A pricing model in which the advertiser is charged for an ad based on how many users take a specific, pre-defined action—such as buying a product from an online store—based on viewing an ad.  This is the “gold standard” for advertisers because it most directly matches the cost of an ad to its effectiveness. However, it’s not commonly used since it’s extremely difficult to measure: it is often unclear when or how to attribute an action to a specific ad. (Also sometimes referred to as Cost Per Acquisition.) Hacks/Hackers Survival Glossary.

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Teaching Tips

We are collecting tips from high school newspaper advisers nationwide on how to run student publications and deal with the issues from administrators, students and parents.

Fundraising ideas from the ASNE High School Journalism Institute

Fund raising

Teachers attending the 2001 ASNE High School Institute at the University of Texas at Austin say finding stable sources of funding for student newspaper is among their most pressing needs.

  • See if your local newspaper will print your paper at cost.
  • Create special issues of the paper on topics (such as graduation) that will draw certain types of ads (flowers, limousines, formal wear, etc.).
  • Ask local newspapers and other businesses to donate old computer equipment.
  • Seek out ads for part-time or summer jobs (such as McDonalds and Wal-Mart) and ads from the military and technical colleges.
  • Create a special classified section built around fun things like song dedications or cute couples.
  • Host and charge admission for a yearbook signing party.
  • Charge other departments at school for desktop publishing jobs, such as designing and printing invitations for a sports team dinner, etc.
  • Host a pizza and/or karaoke night at a local restaurant.
  • During spirit week, set up a both so students can have their picture taken with a cardboard cut-out of someone famous; before Christmas, do photos with “Santa.”
  • If there is not already a designated vendor, consider selling snacks a couple of days a week during lunch or taking/selling photos from the prom or homecoming.
  • Host a powder puff or faculty-student sporting event.
  • Create and sell a faculty cookbook or calendar.
  • Sponsor a “donation drawing” for a limo ride and dinner. Note the specific wording — some schools do not allow raffles!
  • Cake and ice cream sales and car washes are tried and true fund-raisers.