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misdemeanors: Minor criminal offenses, including most traffic violations, which usually result in a fine or brief confinement in a local jail. News Reporting & Writing (Eighth Edition) by the Missouri Group. Copyright 2005. Reproduced by permission of Bedford/St. Martins.

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Joan Strong
English teacher
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Shoud all the news be printed?




Shoud all the news be printed?

Joan Strong of Kennedy High School in Plainview, N.Y.

Joan Strong
Kennedy High School
Plainview, N.Y.

Title: Should all the news be printed?

Background: Two Supreme Court decisions, issued 19 years apart, stand as sentries guarding the way to student press rights: The Hazelwood decision of 1988 (Hazelwood School District vs. Kuhlmeier) and the Tinker decision of 1969 (Tinker et al. vs. Des MoinesIndependent Community School District et al.) Ironically enough, the somewhat conservative Hazelwood decision, which gave school officials the right to censure school newspapers under the guise of setting “high standards for the student speech that is disseminated under its auspices,” was handed down during a liberalperiod of First Amendment interpretation. The effect it has had on school publications is far reaching. There are only five states that developed laws to circumvent the Hazelwood decision.

State standards met (New York)

  1. ELA Standard #1 – Language for Information and Understanding:
    Students will listen, speak, read, and write for information and understanding.

    As listeners and readers, students will collect data, facts, and ideas; discover

    relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and use knowledge generated from

    oral, written, and electronically produced texts. As speakers and writers, they

    will use oral and written language that follows the accepted conventions of the

    English language to acquire, interpret, apply, and transmit information)

  2. ELA Standard #2 – Language for Literary Response and Expression
    Students will read and listen to oral, written, and electronically produced

    texts and performances from American and world literature; relate texts and

    performances to their own lives; and develop an understanding of the diverse

    social, historical, and cultural dimensions the texts and performances

    represent. As speakers and writers, students will use oral and written language

    that follows the accepted conventions of the English language for

    self-expression and artistic creation.
  3. ELA Standard #3 – Language for Social Interactions
    Students will listen, speak, read, and write for social interaction. Students

    will use oral and written language that follows the accepted conventions of the

    English language for effective social communication with a wide variety of

    people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of

    others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.
  4. MST #2 – Information Systems
    Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information using

    appropriate technologies.

Tasks

SHOULD ALL THE NEWS BE PRINTED?

  • Students’ assignment is to answer the question above by finding out all the facts they can about the rights of high school journalists and the newspapers on which they work, particularly as applicable to your state.

  • Next, they must write a 500 word double-spaced, typewritten editorial or opinion piece ( 12 point Times Roman font ) explaining how the two cases affected the First Amendment rights of school newspapers.
    • Find out what your school’s policy is on the First Amendment rights of student publications.
    • How does your policy affect what we write (what you’ve written in the past ) ?
    • Write their opinion on what our school policy should be. How is that different from what it is?
    • Are there any states that have policies different from your state and how is theirs better or worse.
    • Is there any thing they/you can do to change our policy?
    • Do you want to change your policy?
  • Answering all these questions should result in a paper on your First Amendment philosophy.

Process (to give to students)

How do I find all the information to complete my task?

  • Be sure you understand what an editorial (the word editorial is a link to how to write an edi torial) is before you write.

  • Once you’ve determined what you need to include, you need to explore the Hazelwood and Tinker cases. You should also spend time exploring each of the sites listed as they all have something to offer, and they all lead to other sites that may help you fulfill your task.

  • You should thoroughly investigate and understand the facts of the Tinker and Hazelwood cases before you write your editorial.

  • You should write your editorial based on the criteria given on the task page. Answer the guide questions. Follow the format guidelines.

  • This is an individual project. Although you may share the information you find with your classmates, you must write your own editorial.
  • Be sure you understand what an editorial (the word editorial is a link to how to write an edi torial) is before you write.

  • Once you’ve determined what you need to include, you need to explore the Hazelwood and Tinker cases. You should also spend time exploring each of the sites listed as they all have something to offer, and they all lead to other sites that may help you fulfill your task.

  • You should thoroughly investigate and understand the facts of the Tinker and Hazelwood cases before you write your editorial. Answer the guide questions. Follow the format guidelines.

Resources

 



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