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The Davis Dart Davis High School Kaysville, UT
Issue Date: Monday, August 29, 2011 Issue: Volume 85 Last Update: Thursday, January 26, 2012
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At-a-glance

Kyndra Bingham shows off her solo dress. - Kyndra Bingham
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            With every step she takes, sophomore Kyndra Bingham tells folk tales, embraces a family history, and dominates the art of Irish dancing.

            Irish dancing originally had a double meaning, to defy the British while telling folk tales. Each fiddle tune and dance tells a different story, but Bingham said that very few dancers know the story they are dancing out.

            “Irish dancing is not very common. People fly in from all over the country to compete,” said Bingham, whose grandmother and great grandmother performed Irish dancing.

            Although it is not very popular in the United States, it is not less intense than any other sport. “There are girls that spend at least three to four hours practicing every day,” said Bingham. “Some girls are even homeschooled so that they can train.”

            Irish dancing dresses can easily be recognized by their stiff appearance and the intricate knots and designs that cover them. For solo dresses, each dancer has a dress designed specifically for them.   

            “Each dress is one-of-a-kind,” said Bingham, whose own dress is black with neon knots and covered in over 600 crystals. “I have seen absolutely hideous dresses. This one girl had a bright pink dress that looked like it would be for Irish Dance Barbie.”

            The dresses do more than make the girls look pretty. “The dresses make all the difference,” said Bingham. “They get the judge to pay attention to you so that they will give you a better score. When I wore the dress, I looked like a crystal ball.”

            Bingham’s faced trouble with the delivery of her dress, which came from Ireland. “It takes forever for mail to travel between countries. Then, customs checked my dress. It ended up being in customs for two to three weeks,” said Bingham.

            Bingham danced for four years before a February injury forced her to quit in May of 2011 due to pain. Bingham, who had consistent wins at competitions, said that she considered herself to be “not quite super advanced,” and has seen the positive sides of no longer competing.

            “I sacrificed everything for dance. Friends, opportunities, birthday parties,” said Bingham, who has taken up a love for marching band.

            “I’ll miss all of it. It’s a whole other world that you get to be a part of,” she said.

            While she is currently enjoying life without Irish dancing, Bingham said that she has considered returning to it in the future.


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