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Reynolds HSJ Institute

 

What do teachers say about our work?

Read testimonials from teachers who have gone through the Reynolds Institute and/or used my.hsj.org and hsj.org.

More than 150 teachers say the Reynolds Institute is the best training program they've ever taken part in.

Institute announcements

A look at past participants and the universities involved.

2012 news release

2011 news release

2010 news release

2009 news release

2008 news release

2007 news release

2006 news release

2005 news release

2004 news release

2003 news release

2002 news release

2001 news relea

The Reynolds High School Journalism Institutes are intensive two-week journalism training programs for secondary school teachers hosted by five universities and funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. Instruction is based on the core tenets of journalism and the skills needed to produce top-notch student publications, primarily online with multimedia tools.  Applications for the 2013 Institutes are no longer being accepted.  Individuals who applied will be notified by May 6, 2013, of the selection committees' decisions.

If you are not selected or if you did not have the opportunity to apply this year, we encourage you to apply for the 2014 Institutes.  Applications for 2014 will be available on November 1, 2013, and will be due March 1, 2014.

The Institutes not only provide participants with three hours of graduate credit, but also cover an array of topics including news literacy, reporting, writing, editing, multimedia, photojournalism, online layout and design, journalistic credibility, ethics and responsibilities, opinion pages, the future of news, business-side skills, First Amendment matters, privacy and the state of scholastic press freedom.

Since 2000, the Institutes have trained more than 1,900 teachers and enabled them to:

  • Help students start a multimedia student news outlet online.
  • Dramatically improve the quality of existing student media.
  • Enhance their expertise in news literacy, English, civics and social studies.
  • Develop lesson plans and journalism curriculum.

Best of all, the Institutes are free — thanks to funding by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.  All travel, housing, meals, materials and tuition for graduate credit are paid by the Institutes.

Most participants tell us the Institutes are the best professional development they've ever received.

Janet Elbom writes about how Reynolds training can be transformative.

 

An inside look at 2012 Reynolds Institutes

2012 Arizona State University, Phoenix

2012 The University of Texas at Austin

2012 Kent (Ohio) State University

2012 The University of Nevada, Reno

2012 University of Missouri, Columbia

Learn more about past Institutes:

This program is generously funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. To learn more about the foundation, go to this link

This page is http://hsj.org/reynolds.